Western Gallery
Masters of Design exhibition

Displayed on unadorned plywood boxes of varying heights, visitors can pick up and inspect much of the work.

Masters of Design exhibition
Masters of Design exhibition
Masters of Design exhibition

An 8’ wide by 135’ long banner of select Volume projects weaves through the spacious main gallery giving visitors an acutely physical sense of the scope and scale of our work.

Masters of Design exhibition

As the blinking neon sign on the back gallery wall says, our desired response to the exhibit (as with all effective design) is “Huh? Wow!” (Not “Wow! Huh?”)

Masters of Design exhibition

In the main gallery is a “Wailing (Poster) Wall” of inner thoughts, annual milestones, cheeky haikus, and outside comments about Volume’s work, both positive and not so positive.

Masters of Design exhibition

In the side gallery is a projected Skype link with Volume’s office where visitors can see the daily goings-on and can even have an impromptu conversation with the people in the studio.

Masters of Design exhibition

Also in the side gallery, visitors can contribute to the exhibition directly, first, by filling out any of the three sticker roll prompts and sticking them to a column.

Masters of Design exhibition

In spring of 2013, the Western Gallery at Western Washington University in Bellingham hosted a retrospective exhibition of Volume's work. This show was the latest in the gallery’s ongoing Masters of Design series that has honored other contemporary design luminaries including Michael Vanderbyl and Art Chantry.

Subtitled Our Work Shouldn’t Be Here, the 5000 square-foot exhibition captures the experiential essence of Volume’s wide range of work, revealing much about our philosophy, process and personality in addition to our work. It also addresses how to display design that is meant to be touched, read, and used without completely reducing it to a collection of rarefied artifacts frozen behind glass.

Buy an exhibition catalog. (OK, newspaper catalog. But it's only $5!)

RELATED PROJECTS